Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 28, 2017)

Round-up: Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 28, 2017)

 

 

1. The independent counsel team’s plan to interrogate President Park Geun-hye, who is at the heart of the influence-peddling scandal, falls apart. As the acting president Hwang Kyo-an disapprove of the probe, questioning a sitting Korean leader as a suspect for the first time since the establishment of the constitutional government does not take place.

Everyone knows that Park neither has intention nor confidence when it comes to face-to-face investigation.

 

 

2. President Park Geun-hye has submitted a handwritten letter of opinion to Korea’s Constitutional Court on the final hearing. The letter denied the impeachment motion, saying, “I was not involved in corruption in the last 20 years of political journey. Not even once.”

Again, we need the cleaning lady from special prosecutors’ office here. “Damn you.”

 

 

 

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Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 24, 2017)

Round-up: Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 24, 2017)

 

 

1. A candlelight vigil will be held during the weekend as the Constitutional Court’s impeachment trial against Park Geun-hye and special prosecutors’ probe on political scandal head toward a finish line. The Organization for Korean Behavioral Emergency Demanding Park Geun-hye’s Resignation named the 17th Saturday rally as “Park Geun-hye’s four years. Let’s finish it now!”

Park Geun-hye’s four years. Let’s finish it now. See you at the Gwanghwamun Square on Saturday.

 

 

2. As the deadline of special prosecutors probing massive corruption scandal gripping Korea comes to an end, they temporarily suspend indictment and are expected to indict the president either after the impeachment trial or after the resignation. As a result, prosecutors will determine whether to indict Park after she resigns or is impeached.

The destiny awaits her. But I am not sure whether prosecutors will do the same as special prosecutors did.

 

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Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 23, 2017)

Round-up: Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 23, 2017)

 

 

1. During the 16th hearing in the impeachment trial, lawmakers who launched impeachment motion against President Park Geun-hye argue that the president and Choi Soon-sil attempted to privatize the government budget via Mir and K Foundation. Meanwhile, the legal representatives of President Park argue that impeaching the president did not follow the legal process.

What? Who is the one that ignores the legal process and causes influence-peddling scandal?

 

 

2. People no longer use home a desktop PC at anymore. The penetration rate of computer reached its peak at 82.3%, declined to 75.3%, and marked the lowest since 2001. If this trend continues, PC is likely to disappear in the near future.

People can have access to the world with a smartphone. But does it need to disappear?

 

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Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 22, 2017)

Round-up: Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 22, 2017)

 

 

1. The Constitutional Court’s impeachment trial against Korean President Park Geun-hye heads toward a finish line, completing questioning witnesses. Choi Soon-sil and An Chong-bum, the former presidential secretary, who were scheduled to testify during the 16th hearing refused to appear for the hearing today.

So the only thing that is left is whether President Park attends a hearing or not. I hope she visits special prosecutors’ office before she appears for the court.

 

 

2. With household debt reaching 130 trillion won (US$ 113. 8 billion), South Korean household finances weaken, raising the possibility of financial crisis. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) warn that Korea’s household problems face a number of structural headwinds.

Korean citizens saved corporations during the financial crisis 20 years ago. It is corporations’ turn to save the citizens.

 

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Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 17, 2017)

Round-up: Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 17, 2017)

 

 

1. The Constitutional Court has set the last hearing for February 24. Interim Chief Justice Lee Jung-mi says during the 14th hearing that the court set a date for the final hearing on examining witnesses.

The impeachment clock ticks no matter what. Let’s get it over with.

 

 

2. Former presidential secretary, Jung Ho-sung’s statement, was open to the public which South Korean President Park Geun-hye advised him to listen to the opinion of Choi Soon-sil regarding revision of presidential speech. Jung stated that he sent emails to Choi almost every day and talked to her on the phone every day. He also added that Choi and Park exchanged documents several times day.

Housewife Choi Soon-sil had an extremely busy life. She should be rewarded.

 

3. Whenever national emergencies including Sewol Ferry disaster and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) occur in Korea, the Park Guen-hye administration has fostered social conflicts rather than resolving the situation. Pundits say that the voices of victims were completely ignored which can be found from the example of forcing Korea-Japan agreement on comfort women.

Fools rush in when angels fear to tread. The Park government may not survive without North Korea. They are the true pro-North Korea forces.

 

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Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 16, 2017)

Round-up: Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 16, 2017)

 

1. South Korea’s special prosecutors have 12 days to its current investigation deadline. They make all-out efforts to investigate Samsung vice chairman Lee Jae-yong on a charge of bribing South Korean President Park Geun-hye, but they still have other tasks including arresting Lee, questioning the president in person, search and seizure toward Cheong Wa Dae (Bluehouse) and arresting and charging the former presidential secretary Woo Byung-woo.

 

Special prosecutors have done well so far, but they need an extension to its deadline.

 

 

 

 

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Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 15, 2017)

Round-up: Today’s top stories in the morning papers in Korea (February 15, 2017)

 

 

1. The National Assembly took a preemptive attack by submitting Ko Young-tae’s recorded files, the one that President Park Geun-hye has requested. The files reportedly say that the president can do nothing without Choi Soon-sil and that she plans to build her private residence after she leaves her presidency.

Another mistake, huh? Are they defending themselves or doing stand-up comedy?

 

 

2. The Korean government made a strong protest against the Japanese government by calling the Japanese minister to Korea as the Japanese authority refused to amend the government guidelines for teaching for elementary and middle school students which say Dokdo is Japanese territory. The Korean authority says that it is very deplorable and Japan should withdraw their position immediately.

We should also recall our ambassador to Japan and consul general. Don’t just say it. Prove it.

 

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